Coventry Socialists build solidarity for strike at McDonald’s

Coventry Socialists build solidarity for strike at McDonald’s

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Building support for the strike

Coventry Socialist Party members held a campaign stall today in solidarity with the historic strike taking place by workers at McDonald’s. Workers in Crayford and Cambridge took action against their employers in what is both historic and inspirational for all those wanting to fight back against low pay, zero-hour contracts and bullying management. There was warm support for the action today in Coventry- many of the issues faced by McDonald’s workers are experienced by workers across our city.

We are carrying the following article by Richard, a McDonald’s worker in Watford, who explains the background to the current strike and how the movement can grow.


McStrike against low pay

“I have experienced first-hand the insecurity of zero-hour contracts, low pay and abuse by the management, to both me and my fellow workmates”, says Richard, a McDonald’s worker and Socialist Party member.

These grievances will be all too familiar to many workers and are among the reasons McDonald’s staff are striking for the first time on 4 September.

Richard says: “Seeing workers mobilise in two restaurants and balloting in favour of action has inspired me to build the union in my workplace and fight for the same pay and conditions.

“I am 100% behind the union taking strike action and will also be attending the protest outside McDonald’s HQ in East Finchley, London, on 2 September. Solidarity with the McDonald’s workers walking out on the 4 September!”

Historic

The workers, members of bakers’ union BFAWU, balloted at Crayford, south east London, and Cambridge stores have voted by an incredible 95.7% in favour of strikeaction.

Already, by voting for the historic strike, the workers have forced McDonald’s to implement the twice-promised offer of guaranteed hours for every McDonald’s worker in the UK.

McDonald’s workers will join a list including health workers in east Londonbin workers in Birmingham and janitors in Glasgow who have been fighting for better pay and conditions – and in the case of the latter two, winning.

Their action shows we can beat the bosses and their inspiring strike action should be a signal not just to employers, but to other low-paid, exploited workers that we can fight back and organise to get rid of zero-hour contracts, bullying bosses and poverty pay.

On 20 August, as a member of BFAWU, Richard attended a McDonald’s strike committee meeting as a visitor. He reports: “The meeting took place at one of the strike locations in Crayford and a decision was made to walk out on 4 September. The step was a historic decision and will be the first ever McDonald’s strike to take place in the UK.

“At the meeting McDonald’s workers from Crayford and Cambridge spoke of the reasons why they decided to take strike action. These included the failure of the company to roll out fixed-term contracts and the continued utilisation of exploitative zero-hour contracts, low pay, job insecurity and bullying management.”

The strike takes place on 4 September. Workers are also fighting for a £10 an hour minimum wage now, and union recognition.

The Socialist Party fights for these demands for all workers and will be supporting the McDonald’s strikers in their dispute.

You can donate to the strike fund and send messages of support at fastfoodrights.wordpress.com, and join the #McStrike events and picket lines.

Youth in Coventry and Birmingham demand a real living wage of at least £10 per hour

Youth in Coventry and Birmingham demand a real living wage of at least £10 per hour

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Socialist Youth campaigner supporting a real living wage of £10 per hour!

Youth Fight for Jobs were out on the streets of Coventry and Birmingham on Friday 1st April talking to the public about the introduction of the ‘national living wage’ and building the fight for a real living wage of at least £10 per hour, with no exemptions!

Hundreds of leaflets were distributed in both cities explaining that the Tories have not introduced a genuine living wage and that millions will stay face a battle against poverty.

Read this article from the current issue of The Socialist for more information

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In Birmingham

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End poverty pay!

Nellist and left wing trade unionists oppose the EU and say no public money should go to UKIP and Tory campaigns

Nellist and left wing union leaders oppose the EU and say no public money should go to UKIP and Tory campaigns

Dave Nellist

Dave Nellist, National Chair of TUSC

The following letter from Dave Nellist and leading left wing trade unionists appeared in The Guardian newspaper today. The original can be read here

‘Now the referendum has been called , the Electoral Commission has the power to designate who shall be the “official” Remain and Leave campaigns, giving these organisations both political authority and millions of pounds of public resources. We call on the commission not to give taxpayers’ money to the Tory and Ukip-dominated Vote Leave, Leave.EU or Grassroots Out campaigns, or any amalgam of them, in the forthcoming EU referendum. The commission does not have to choose an official campaign at all, if there is not one organisation that adequately represents those supporting a particular outcome to the referendum.

We believe there are millions of trade unionists, young people, anti-austerity campaigners and working-class voters, whose opposition to the big business-dominated EU would not be represented by these organisations.

We condemn the mainstream media for promoting Ukip, Tory and other pro-austerity and racist establishment politicians and organisations as the only exit voices. We call on the Electoral Commission to recognise that a significant proportion of those who will vote against the EU do so because they support basic socialist policies of workers’ rights, public ownership, and opposition to austerity and racism.’
Dave Nellist Ex-Labour MP and chair of the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition
Janice Godrich President, PCS civil servants union
Sean Hoyle President, RMT transport workers union
John McInally National vice-president, PCS
Peter Pinkney RMT President 2013-2015
Paul McDonnell RMT national executive committee
John Reid RMT NEC
Dave Auger Unison public sector workers union NEC
April Ashley Unison NEC
Roger Bannister Unison NEC
Hugo Pierre Unison NEC
Karen Reissman Unison NEC
Polly Smith Unison NEC
Pete Glover National Union of Teachers NEC
Jane Nellist NUT NEC
Stefan Simms NUT NEC
Chas Berry Napo national vice-chair
Alan Gibson National Union of Journalists NEC
Elenor Haven PCS NEC
Marianne Owens PCS NEC
Paul Williams PCS NEC
Carlo Morelli University and College Union NEC
Richard McEwan UCU NEC
Sean Wallis UCU NEC
Saira Weiner UCU NEC
Mike Forster Unison local government service group executive (SGE)
Huw Williams Unison local government SGE
Gary Freeman Unison health SGE