Obituary: Ged Travers 1957-2018

Obituary: Ged Travers 1957-2018

Socialist Party members in Coventry were amongst those saddened to learn that Ged Travers passed away on Saturday 14th July, after two years of brave and dignified struggle against cancer.

Ged worked in a number of jobs over the years, starting with service in the RAF Regiment in Northern Ireland, “the mob” as he put it, where he learned a healthy disrespect for authority. He first joined our party in the early 1980’s. Years then as a firefighter at Birmingham airport introduced him to trade unionism. As a Coventry bus driver he successfully helped lead a major strike in 2001, where his character and vast knowledge of past strikes were invaluable.

He always had a passion for reading and learning. This included areas like film and photography but mostly he wanted to know about working-class struggle. This took him to study at Ruskin College of Oxford University. He was incredibly well-read and was debating the details of Trotsky’s memoirs with Party members only days before passing away. One Coventry Socialist remarked “Ged inspired me to read, read independently and read critically”.

There was a personal struggle as well, over some years, with alcohol and drugs. We mention this because in 2011 he achieved the rare feat of giving both up completely. The determination and strength of character that took was one of Ged’s most impressive characteristics.

Ged on a demonstration in Greece

Free to resume life, he took a low-cost journey around the Balkans ending up in Greece, a country entering political crisis. He took a liking to that country’s fighters, as they did to him. We can do no better than end with the obituary they wrote:

On July 14, our comrade Ged Travers left our life.

We met Ged in Greece in 2011 when he first came here for a few months to find out what was happening in our country during the crisis. He liked and stayed in Thessalonica, where he photographed scenes in the city, mainly from a political and journalistic perspective.

He stayed in our country for several years, making friends and forming relationships with many people. He actively participated in the political life of Xekinima (the Greek sister organisation of the Socialist Party) despite the language barrier. He took part in many mobilizations of the anti-gold mining movement in Halkidiki, which he recorded with his camera.

His favourite book was “Captains” by Dominique Eudes, which he read and re-read. He was fascinated by the history of the Greek resistance and guerrilla struggle against the Nazis.

Ged was born in England in 1957. He did a lot of jobs, but the turning point that radicalized his conscience was his term as a soldier in Ireland, where the British army functioned as an occupying force. He joined Millitant, our sister organization in Britain, later renamed the Socialist Party. Despite disagreements he had with us at times, he remained a supporter of revolutionary ideas until the end of his life. In addition to the collective struggle he also fought a personal battle, as he suffered for some years from his dependence on alcohol. He was strong and stubborn enough cope with it, free himself, and move on with life.

Laughing and always easy to talk to, he was a very warm presence for all of us. About two years ago, he was diagnosed with advanced cancer. He returned to England where he started treatments. He treated the illness with composure, patience, and even humour. But unfortunately his body was too distressed to endure. Farewell Good Comrade Ged, we will always remember your smile!

Date set for EU referendum – the Socialist view

Date set for EU referendum – the Socialist view

notobosses

For a Socialist Europe

David Cameron has announced that the EU referendum will take place on Thursday 23rd June. The months up until this date will see campaigns across the country advocating a leave or remain position.

What is the position of the Socialist Party?

The Socialist Party will be campaigning for a vote to leave the capitalist EU.

In a recent issue of our newspaper, The Socialist, we wrote

‘The Socialist Party opposes the EU because, as Greece showed (the EU enforced massive austerity on Greece which unfortunately has not been resisted by Syriza – Coventry SP), its laws and institutions, while they ultimately could not stop a determined workers’ government supported by a mass movement from carrying out socialist policies, are another hurdle to overcome. We oppose the EU, Cameron’s deal included, in order to defend working class interests and take forward the fight for socialism, in Britain and Europe.’

We will provide further comment over the coming weeks and months on the EU referendum, on our position and how we can build the fight against capitalism and support the struggle for a Socialist Europe.

For now, here are some links to articles which provide a useful resource of information

Cameron’s EU renegotiation charade

Don’t give taxpayers’ money to UKIP and Tory EU campaigners

Socialists and the EU referendum

No to a capitalist EU, yes to a Socialist Europe

Capitalists strangling Greece – article by a German Marxist

 

 

Our 10 most popular posts in 2015

Our 10 most popular posts in 2015

No evictions here!

No evictions here!

As we move in to 2016, we look back at our 10 most popular posts from 2015. Our website received a record number of views in 2015, and we thank all of those who wrote articles, contributed photographs, or who shared our articles on social media. It makes a big difference!

We have published dozens of articles on a wide variety of issues – from important campaigns in the city and surrounding area such as Save Coventry Libraries, from picket lines when strikes have taken place, the anti Bedroom Tax movement and the struggles of youth and students.

In 2016 we encourage you to connect with us on Facebook and Twitter and to take the next step in the fight for Socialism!

Here are the 10 most popular articles from 2015

  1. TUSC wins nearly 400 votes in Kenilworth
  2. Dave Nellist on the Artist Taxi Driver
  3. Museum staff forced to take pay cut
  4. Over 100 people join Coventry protest against austerity
  5. ‘Either we fight or we lay down and die’ – Protest at Coventry City Link
  6. Dave Nellist outlines the Socialist response to the TTIP deal
  7. Another eviction stopped in Coventry
  8. 2015 elections – Vote Socialist on 7th May
  9. Nellist welcomes left wing victory in Greece
  10. Coventry students demand £10 for uni workers

We wish you a Happy New Year, join us in the struggle for socialism in 2016!

 

 

Hundreds protest across West Midlands against Tory Austerity Budget

Hundreds protest across West Midlands against Tory Austerity Budget

The Tories emergency budget on 8th July saw vicious attacks on huge sections of society. But one group particularly hard hit was young people. The abolition of student grants, attacks on our right to housing benefit and that under-25s will be excluded from the new so-called living wage, mean young people are facing an even more bleak and uncertain future. But Osborne’s cuts budget was met with resistance. Protests took place around the country. In the West Midlands, Youth Fight for Jobs and young members of the Socialist Party organised 6 events throughout the day.

Despite catching the only times during the day where it rained, protests were held in Wolverhampton and Nuneaton while the budget proposals were being announced. With Youth Fight for Jobs organised events taking place later on in the day in Stoke and Worcester as well.

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  Nuneaton Protesters

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Wolverhampton

Aidan from Nuneaton reported;“We had loads of good conversations with people who were disgusted with Tory austerity and happily signed petitions and took leaflets away about building the anti-austerity movement”

100 people also attended an early evening demonstration in Coventry, that marched from Broadgate Square to Coventry Council House. Linking the latest draconian austerity measures with the proposed attacks on Trade Union facility time by Coventry’s Labour Council.

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Coventry protesters march to the Council House

In Birmingham an energetic crowd over of over 300 people heard from numerous speakers of different ages, some being new to the experience.

A group photograph was taken in support of the Greek people, after which, everyone marched to the West Midlands BBC office. Chanting all the way, and gaining attention from passers-by, the march delivered a letter to the West Midlands BBC director requesting they present more anti-austerity coverage.

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Birmingham

YFJ’s lively stalls and their demands of a £10 an hour minimum wage, rebuilding public services and a 24-hour general strike were extremely popular. A short but vibrant rally included speakers from the RMT, CWU and Unison as well as YFJ and campaigners against cuts to local library services.

Overall, with a youthful and fresh feeling, the protests have added to the range of demonstrations held across the region and has received much positive feedback from people. Over 150 people signed up to be involved in YFJ’s future anti austerity campaigns across the West Midlands who had never participated in political activity before.